Writing Wins and Woes: During Winning Times

Writing Wins and Woes: During Winning Times

Again, I am cheerleading for my husband. This painting is actually a mural on our living room wall, which is still a work in progress for him. This wintry scene is a story in itself. Viewers of it can lose themselves in the narrative of colonial-type settlers, carolers strolling in robes, horse and wagons, and one or two sci-fi elements thrown in because that’s what he likes to do with his paintings. Enjoy.

I’m pleased to announce that I had two more publications since I wrote last. I am still reeling in my blessings this week. One was for the Photo Flash contest and the other was for the Penn Cove literary Arts Award. Here are the links for both.

http://whidbeystudents.com/
http://www.enchantedspark.com/photoflarepastwinners.php

These are both flash stories, very short, so please read, enjoy and comment. Writers love feedback.

Also, I want to include the link for my author interview on Strange Musings, concerning my story in the anthology, Alternate Hilarities. I loved answering the questions about how I came to write the story and other pieces of writing trivia.
http://www.strangemusingspress.com/2014/05/author-interview-shari-klase.html

All this is very exciting. So here is some words of advice for the those few and far between winning times.
1. Enjoy the win. That’s first. Sometimes we worry about what’s coming next when we’re on a winning roll. Will there be ten more rejections that follow? Probably. But enjoy the win while you have it.
2.Keep writing. It’s also easy to rest and bask in your win and not move forward. Don’t do that. Staying stagnant is moving backwards. Keep on writing and submitting.
3. Take advantage of opportunities to toot your horn. Publicity is great for gaining readership and moving toward bigger publications. Don’t be afraid to do that or too humble to do that. It is stepping in time toward your goal of achieving in your writing profession. This is your job if you are a writer. Don’t let people tell you you’re being proud, or don’t tell yourself that. If you want to be a successful writer, you have to advertise.
4. Be prepared for rejections. I have to say it. I know when I succeed, failure is just a step behind me, sometimes half a step. Don’t get discouraged. It’s also part of the process. They’re not failures; they’re lessons to help you write better next time. Any publisher will tell you you’re story is probably not a total flop, at least most will, it’s just competing with many others. This time your story didn’t make it. Next time it may. In my early writing days, a few rejections kept me from submitting. I didn’t want to open myself up to such criticisms of what was more than my writing; more like a part of me. Every writer feels that way. You’ll wound and you’ll have scar tissue but you’ll heal and you’ll be stronger.
5. Don’t quit. That’s a funny thing to say when you’ve just succeeded in winning, but some people say, Okay, I’ve done it. I’ve accomplished my goal. I resign. Don’t resign. Keep going. Some of the best writers did that. Need I say, To Kill a Mockingbird. The best is yet to come.

I need to say to those who aren’t in winning times right now, I did have two rejections this week as well–Timeless Tales and Knowonder! and Guess what? They both hurt. Rejections sting, but I’m moving on. You move on, too.

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Writing Wins and Woes: During Winning Times”

  1. Congrats on your accomplishments this week. You should be proud.

    I wholeheartedly agree with your advice, especially about “not quitting”, regardless if it’s over an acceptance or a rejection. It’s part of the business. You need to be borderline obsessed to succeed in this industry, and even then, you might not make it. But at least you might accomplish things and achieve goals you might have never thought you’d make. That’s been the case for me, at least.

    1. Agree, agree, agree, Holly! I am definitely border line obsessed when it comes to writing. Thanks for the good words. Thinking good thoughts for you.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s